Inequality and the social crisis

Report finds majority of Australian youth favour socialism

By Oscar Grenfell, 25 June 2018

The poll showed that the growing attraction to socialism is closely related to a rise of anti-capitalist sentiments.

US court documents reveal

Immigrant children tied down, hooded, beaten, stripped and drugged

By Patrick Martin, 22 June 2018

US immigrant detention centers are applying the techniques of Guantanamo Bay and CIA torture prisons on teenagers and even younger children.

Australian Senate votes for huge tax cuts for wealthy

By Mike Head, 22 June 2018

The tax plans are designed to boost corporate profits and investors’ incomes under conditions of global turmoil and trade war.

Another New York City taxi driver commits suicide

By Clare Hurley, 21 June 2018

Abdul Saleh’s suicide is the sixth among the city’s livery drivers in the last six months.

Assets of world’s “high net wealth” millionaires surged to $70 trillion in 2017

By Barry Grey, 20 June 2018

The stock market boom and the entire process of social plunder have depended on the suppression of working class opposition and a savage attack on workers’ living standards.

Five die fleeing US immigration police as children spend Father’s Day in jail

By Eric London, 18 June 2018

The five immigrants died in a car crash in south Texas, while seven others were wounded in what police called “good police work.”

The oligarchy rules: Amazon and corporations veto Seattle homelessness tax

By Will Morrow, 13 June 2018

It took just four weeks for the Democratic Party-controlled city council to completely capitulate to the campaign by Amazon and other corporations.

Memphis, Tennessee: A portrait of inequality and social crisis in the southern US

By Jimmy Smith and Naomi Spencer, 13 June 2018

The headquarters of global shipping giant FedEx, Memphis also holds the dubious distinction of being number one in the country in child poverty.

More than half of Australian workers in part-time insecure employment

By Terry Cook, 11 June 2018

Decades of job destruction have produced a “gig economy,” with many young workers unlikely to ever hold a full-time job.

Mental health, substance abuse, life stresses and economic despair fuel crisis

US suicides increased by 25 percent from 1999 to 2016

By Kate Randall, 9 June 2018

The dramatic increase in suicides shows that, despite claims of the end of the Great Recession in mid-2009, increasing numbers of people are facing incredible personal and financial hardships.

Cincinnati, Ohio area fentanyl overdoses increase by one thousand percent over the last five years

By Matthew Taylor, 9 June 2018

The surge of fentanyl related deaths in Ohio’s third largest city exposes the depth of the social crisis which continues to rage across the United States.

Youth suicide rate up 56 percent from 2007 to 2016

Government report shows sharp rise in US teen deaths

By Kate Randall, 2 June 2018

The new statistics on deaths among US children and teens expose the social crisis confronting America’s youth in the form of gun violence, suicide, the opioid crisis, poverty and war.

Impoverishment pushes another New York City taxi driver to suicide

By Philip Guelpa, 1 June 2018

In the five months from the beginning of the year, five taxi or livery drivers have committed suicide due to dramatic income declines caused by competition from ride-share companies.

New effort to cover up impact of lead poisoning in Flint

By James Brewer, 30 May 2018

A resolution reportedly passed by doctors at Flint Hurley Medical Center puts forward the false narrative that no one was lead poisoned in Flint, but lead-exposed.

Rich list shows more Australian billionaires than ever

By Oscar Grenfell, 30 May 2018

The wealthiest six individuals alone control almost as much wealth as the poorest 20 percent of the population.

As CEO compensation soars to new heights

Fifty-one million US households cannot afford “survival budget”

By Kate Randall, 26 May 2018

Four in 10 US adults are a $400 expense away from financial ruin, and the typical employee would have to work 275 years to earn the average compensation of a top-200 CEO.

Australian feminists deny mental health crisis behind Margaret River murder-suicide

By Cheryl Crisp, 26 May 2018

The proponents of feminist identity politics provide a cover for the social conditions that led to the tragedy.

University of South Florida one of the most militarized in United States

By Alex Johnson, 25 May 2018

The public university in Tampa, Florida is one of the country’s leading schools in military officer training and veteran enrollment.

Puerto Rican students at New York University ask to stay another semester

By Isaac Finn, 24 May 2018

Twenty-seven Puerto Rican students, who are attending NYU through a program to aid survivors of Hurricane Maria, have requested that the NYU administration extend the program.

Destruction of Nashville, Tennessee public housing advances

By Keisha Gibbs, 22 May 2018

As older, smaller homes are torn down and replaced with homes triple in size and price, current residents of many Nashville neighborhoods are being priced out of the city.

Sunday Times Rich List: Wealth of Britain’s richest grew 10 percent

By Simon Whelan, 22 May 2018

In the same year that 72 people were killed in London’s Grenfell Tower inferno due to cost-cutting, the city’s wealthiest residents became even richer.

Police engaged in 25-minute shootout with Texas high school gunman

By Kate Randall, 21 May 2018

According to the Galveston County sheriff, it is unclear whether some of the Santa Fe High School victims were in fact shot by police officers responding to the shooting.

Australian apartment owners to join legal action over flammable cladding

By Paul Bartizan, 21 May 2018

Despite last year’s Grenfell Tower disaster in Britain, Australian governments refuse to take any serious action to remove flammable cladding or stop its widespread use.

Wealth-X report shows billionaires gained $1.8 trillion in 2017

By Eric London, 21 May 2018

The social needs of the working class can be met and its democratic rights defended only by expropriating the wealth of the super-rich.

Ten killed in mass shooting at Texas high school

By Trévon Austin, 19 May 2018

The horrific frequency of mass shootings in the US is indicative of a diseased society, combining extreme levels of social alienation with the endless promotion of militarism by the ruling class.

Back to the 19th century

Trump administration preparing green light to child labor

By Patrick Martin, 11 May 2018

The Labor Department wants to lift longstanding restrictions on use of heavy equipment, including chain-saws, by 16- and 17-year-olds.

Louisiana: 20,000 nursing home residents face eviction as state legislature slashes Medicaid

By Matthew Taylor, 11 May 2018

Recent budget cuts passed by the Louisiana House of Representatives would force tens of thousands of elderly and disabled citizens onto the streets.

Report underscores Australian rental affordability crisis

By Oscar Grenfell, 8 May 2018

The inflated housing bubble has created a social disaster, especially for recipients of poverty-level government welfare.

The case for expropriation

Amazon halts construction in Seattle to protest tax hike

By Eric London, 4 May 2018

Amazon’s market capitalization is $757.9 billion. Conditions of life for billions of people could be drastically improved by expropriating this wealth.

CIA expands its Signature School program to University of Illinois Chicago

By George Gallanis and Kristina Betinis, 4 May 2018

The program permits the CIA to have a regular recruiting presence on the university’s Chicago campus.

As CEO pay, corporate profits and corporate cash hit new highs

US housing secretary proposes tripling of rent for the poor

By Kate Randall, 30 April 2018

The Trump administration’s latest proposal would impose even greater suffering on families already beset by hunger, poor housing and lack of medical care.

Australian health care costs among the worst internationally

By John Mackay, 26 April 2018

Deepening cuts to public health funding mean patients confront higher out of pocket charges from doctors, clinics and hospitals.

NY Times, Mark Rudd on anniversary of Columbia U sit-in: Socialist revolution is a “fantasy”

By Patrick Martin, 26 April 2018

Mark Rudd, the most prominent leader of the student protests at Columbia University in 1968, has taken to the pages of the leading capitalist newspaper to deny the possibility of revolution.

Some unionized Alaska Air workers earn less than minimum wage

By our reporter, 25 April 2018

Workers who unload and load cargo planes start at a measly rate of only $11.74 per hour for work that is backbreaking and grueling and quite frequently done under adverse weather conditions.

US federal, state governments wage war on workers and the poor

By Kate Randall, 24 April 2018

While Trump and corporate boardrooms celebrate the “booming” economy and the rising stockpiles of cash for the super-rich, they are seeking ways to gut what remains of the social safety net.

Australian banking revelations fuel political crisis

By Mike Head, 23 April 2018

Public outrage has mounted as damning evidence emerges from hearings conducted by a royal commission into financial services.

Social inequality and oligarchy in the US and Europe

By Eric London, 21 April 2018

A report by Thomas Piketty shows that the Democratic Party in the US, the Labour Party in Britain and the Socialist Party in France have become the preferred parties of dominant sections of the ruling elite.

US students hold national walkout against school violence

By our reporters, 21 April 2018

While Democrats are attempting to direct the anger of youth into the midterm elections and calls for gun control, the demonstrations have revealed broad hostility to the entire political establishment.

No money for teacher pay or textbooks, but…

US CEO pay, bank profits, corporate cash set new records

By Barry Grey, 18 April 2018

A series of reports released over the past week reveal that corporate America and the financial oligarchy are wallowing in record levels of wealth.

Seven killed, 17 injured in South Carolina prison riot

By Kayla Costa, 17 April 2018

The worst US prison riot in a quarter-century reveals the brutal conditions of inmates, who often live for years without mental health treatment and quality social interaction.

French students protest war, support striking rail workers

By Alex Lantier, 16 April 2018

Students at Tolbiac University spoke to the WSWS Friday about their opposition to war in Syria, plans to reinstate the draft, and social austerity in France.

Students oppose Portland State University tuition hikes

By Kayla Costa, 16 April 2018

Despite a student backlash, the Portland State University board of trustees still plans to vote to raise tuition by up to 9 percent for the coming semester.

More US states imposing Medicaid work requirements

By Kate Randall, 14 April 2018

Some states are considering expanding Medicaid while at the same time imposing work requirements, premium payments and drug testing of recipients.

Trump signs executive order attacking US social programs

By Matthew Taylor, 13 April 2018

President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday requiring his cabinet to target for destruction any social programs that do not have work requirements.

Nor Any Drop to Drink previewed to Flint audience

By James Brewer, 13 April 2018

Central Michigan University sociology professor Cedrick Taylor presented his new documentary at the University of Michigan in Flint.

Nashville parents, teachers and students decry public school cuts

By Keisha Gibbs and Warren Duzak, 9 April 2018

Public schools in Nashville, Tennessee face cuts to free food programs and elimination of funding to schools with impoverished students.

Lawsuit accuses Washington, D.C. of destroying personal belongings of the homeless

By Harvey Simpkins, 9 April 2018

Plaintiffs allege that their tents, mattresses, food, clothing, electronics and identity documents were either lost or destroyed during numerous city-led clearings of their encampment in 2016 and 2017.

University of Chicago student with mental illness shot by campus police

By George Marlowe, 6 April 2018

Suffering from a severe mental breakdown, Charles Thomas was shot and wounded by campus police Tuesday night. He now faces criminal charges.

City of Detroit resuming brutal policy of mass water shutoffs

By Debra Watson, 5 April 2018

Amidst talk of Detroit making a “comeback” the city is preparing to once again carry out the mass disruption of water service to thousands of low income residents.

One dead, three injured in shooting at YouTube HQ in Northern California

By Norisa Diaz, 4 April 2018

While the motive for the shooting remains unclear, what is certain is that American society continues to produce mass shootings on an almost daily basis.

Howard University students occupy campus building in Washington, D.C.

By Nick Barrickman, 2 April 2018

Students have been occupying the university administration building since it was revealed that campus employees had inappropriately received college grants and waivers.

Homeless cleared from Anaheim, California encampment remain in limbo

By Adam Mclean, 31 March 2018

While the long-term future of the Anaheim homeless is still uncertain, the about-face by the county will strand them for the immediate term.

Australian government forced to delay company tax cut bill

By Mike Head, 30 March 2018

The setback could reignite the factional rifts that have wracked both the Liberal and National parties, especially since the Coalition government’s near-defeat in 2016.

Tens of thousands protest mass shootings in New York, Michigan, Boston and the southern United States

By Tom Hall, 27 March 2018

IYSSE members and supporters spoke to demonstrators at a large number of demonstrations throughout the country.

“This can be turned around by people who want to build a new society”

California: Protesters denounce war and social inequality

By our reporters, 27 March 2018

The large turnout in the most populous US state reflects a political shift, as a new generation of young people are being thrust into politics for the first time.

The international significance of the March for Our Lives demonstrations

By Eric London, 26 March 2018

The mass demonstrations in the heart of world imperialism point to the intensification of social tensions and the class struggle worldwide.

“No more wars, no more violence!”

Over 80,000 youth and students in Chicago protest against mass violence

By the International Youth and Students for Social Equality at the University of Illinois at Chicago, 26 March 2018

The March for Our Lives demonstration in Chicago was one of the largest in the city’s history and demonstrates a growing radicalization and movement to the left by youth and students.

“I am motivated to make that change for our future generations”

Students, youth speak about war, inequality at DC March for Our Lives rally

By Tom Hall, 26 March 2018

High school students and other youth who attended the rally had far more on their minds than gun control and the midterm elections—the issues promoted by the media and the Democratic Party.

Another New York City taxi driver commits suicide due to financial ruin

By Sandy English, 26 March 2018

Nicanor Ochisor killed himself after a dramatic decline in his income due to the deregulation of Uber and other e-hailing services in the city.

Hundreds of thousands of students march against mass violence in America

By Tom Hall, 25 March 2018

The scale of the demonstrations show that the crisis of American and world capitalism is working its way into the consciousness of young people and propelling a new generation into political struggle.

The protests against school shootings and the growth of the class struggle

By Joseph Kishore, 24 March 2018

The simultaneous development of a movement among workers and student youth portends a major eruption of social and class conflict in the United States and internationally.

Now available from Mehring Books

New pamphlet: The social and political roots of mass shootings in America

By Shannon Jones, 24 March 2018

There is a growing awareness that something is deeply amiss with the present social order.

“Financial toxicity” affects poorer cancer patients in Australia

By Margaret Rees, 23 March 2018

High medical payments and reduced income while patients are being treated or recovering from cancer are causing distress and avoidable deaths.

Officials call for more police in schools after shooting in suburban Maryland

By Nick Barrickman, 22 March 2018

The most recent school shooting comes just days before Saturday’s scheduled “March for Our Lives” protests in Washington, DC and across the United States.

Homeless family of four found dead in van in Orange County, California

By Kimie Saito, 19 March 2018

The tragic incident further exposes the housing crisis in Orange County, California where police have recently been working to clear out hundreds of people from homeless encampments.

Death toll rises to six in Miami bridge collapse as new information emerges about contractors

By Matthew Taylor, 17 March 2018

As rescue operations continue, new information has emerged about the companies responsible for the Miami bridge collapse on Thursday

The significance of the mass student protests against gun violence in America

By Genevieve Leigh, 16 March 2018

While Democrats and the media have sought to restrict the protests to calls for gun control, there are much broader issues behind the politicization of young people in the US.

Trump administration approves punitive work requirements for Arkansas Medicaid program

By Shelley Connor, 12 March 2018

Arkansas’ new eligibility requirements, scheduled to begin on June 1, are some of the strictest since CMS began granting waivers this year.

Four dead following hostage situation at Northern California veterans home

By Alec Andersen, 10 March 2018

The hostages were employees of the nonprofit organization Pathway House, which provides services to veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Reject the sellout on tuition waivers—for free higher education for all

Striking Illinois grad students speak out against attacks on higher education

By Andy Thompson and Jessica Goldstein, 9 March 2018

The Graduate Employees Organization is desperately trying to shut-down the strike of 2,700 graduate student workers at the University of Illinois.

US emergency departments report significant increase in opioid overdoses among all age groups, including infants

By Shelley Connor, 8 March 2018

Recent studies demonstrate that emergency department visits for opioid overdose increased by 30 percent across the United States in 2017.

Parasitism and “tax reform”: Trump’s corporate tax cuts fuel stock buybacks, not investment

By Gabriel Black, 6 March 2018

Catalyst Capital predicts that 2018 will be the biggest stock buyback year on record, with corporations spending $1.2 trillion to push up their share values.

Deep social crisis ignored in South Australian election campaign

By Mike Head, 6 March 2018

After clinging to office for 16 years, the state Labor government could be swept out, or forced to form a minority administration with “SA Best.”

After Parkland shooting, dozens of US students arrested for social media posts

By Genevieve Leigh, 2 March 2018

The tragic death of 14 students and three teachers at the Florida high school has triggered a law-and-order crackdown on students alleged to have posted threatening remarks on social media.

Trump proposes cuts to heating aid while US house fire deaths spike

By Steve Filips, 1 March 2018

This season’s severe winter and frigid temperatures is exacting a brutal toll in fire fatalities.

US Senate report details funding of patient advocacy groups by opioid manufacturers

By Brian Dixon, 27 February 2018

The manufacturers of five major opioid products donated nearly $9 million to 14 supposedly independent patient advocacy organizations between 2000 and 2017.

Los Angeles report on homelessness reveals widening funding gap

By Adam Mclean, 23 February 2018

Homelessness in LA is growing at a much higher rate than was previously thought, outstripping the already limited funding allocated to programs aimed at aiding the homeless.

The Parkland shooting: Why are mass killings so common in the United States?

By Eric London, 23 February 2018

Thousands of students have joined demonstrations in the aftermath of the latest eruption of homicidal violence. But to stop the killings, they need to understand the deeper social and political roots of these tragedies.

IYSSE meeting draws together Flint, Puerto Rico, Kentucky workers to discuss water crisis

By our reporter, 23 February 2018

The meeting provided a forum for workers and youth to discuss the root causes of the mounting water crisis in the US and internationally and a socialist perspective to fight back.

Students and workers call for the unity of the working class following meeting on Flint water crisis

By our reporters, 23 February 2018

Students and workers who attended the meeting spoke to the WSWS and expressed their support for the struggle of workers in Puerto Rico, Kentucky and Flint.

Mounting protests, walkouts by US students against school shootings

By Kate Randall, 21 February 2018

Protesting students have aimed their fire at local politicians, the US Congress and President Trump over their failure to do anything to stop school shootings.

Germany: Youth leader Kühnert seeks to save the SPD—and the state

By Johannes Stern, 20 February 2018

Kühnert’s appearance on Tuesday evening in Berlin-Kreuzberg made clear which social and political interests, fears and calculations lie behind the campaign of the Jusos.

The coal slurry disaster of 2000

The story behind the water crisis in Martin County, Kentucky

By Carlos Delgado, 19 February 2018

The water crisis in eastern Kentucky can be traced back to the bursting of a coal slurry dam owned by Massey Energy in 2000.

Funerals begin in Florida as details emerge of prior warnings about school shooter

By Patrick Martin, 17 February 2018

The FBI admitted that it had received two separate warnings about the Nikolas Cruz, the second, only six weeks ago, suggesting he was likely to target a school.

Trump budget proposes massive cuts in food stamps and other social programs

By Shelley Connor, 17 February 2018

The proposed cuts would mean starvation for large numbers of poor Americans.

Trump war budget calls for sweeping cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps

By Patrick Martin, 13 February 2018

The White House urged congressional Republicans to proceed with the military spending proposed in a bipartisan budget deal last week, but renege on promises to increase spending on domestic social programs.

Kentucky residents face water shutoffs as UK study exposes health dangers from leaking pipes

By Warren Duzak, 13 February 2018

After losing service due to collapsing infrastructure, Martin County residents now face shutoffs and a 50 percent rate hike for contaminated water.

Puerto Rico blackout exposes the precarious state of the island’s electrical grid

By Matthew Taylor, 13 February 2018

An explosion ripped through the Monacillo power plant outside of San Juan Sunday night, leaving 175,000 residents without power for several hours.

Studies connect Medicaid work requirements to poor health

By Shelley Connor, 12 February 2018

While the Trump administration heralds Medicaid work requirements as a path towards better health and prosperity for America’s poor, recent studies reveal the opposite.

US: Food insecurity may be twice as common as previously estimated

By Mark Ferretti, 10 February 2018

A clear class division separates those who can buy healthy food easily from those who cannot.

Sleeping rough in the UK: “I never expected to be on the streets”

By Margot Miller and Dennis Moore, 10 February 2018

WSWS reporters recently spoke to rough sleepers on the streets of Manchester in north west England.

Falling US life expectancy: The product of a deliberate ruling class policy

By Kate Randall, 9 February 2018

The US is wracked by record social inequality, a catastrophic health crisis, and a government health policy aimed at deliberately lowering life expectancy while catering to corporate profit.

Students and workers denounce bipartisan attacks on immigrants

By Anthony del Olmo, 9 February 2018

The International Youth and Students for Social Equality has held meetings on the defense of immigrants at several US universities.

Columbia University refuses to recognize graduate student union

By Isaac Finn, 9 February 2018

Columbia University in New York City has refused to recognize the Graduate Workers of Columbia-United Auto Workers (GWC-UAW) Local 2110 as the bargaining agent for student workers on campus.

New York City limousine driver kills himself in protest over poverty wages

By Sandy English, 8 February 2018

Schifter’s suicide note blamed corporations and Mayor de Blasio, Governor Cuomo and former Mayor Bloomberg for destroying his livelihood.

Notes from Puerto Rico

Thousands of workers in Puerto Rico continue to live without running water

By Antonio Castro, 8 February 2018

This is the second in a series of updates from a local Puerto Rican worker on the unfolding crisis on the island in the wake of Hurricane María.

Australia: Why the RTBU is muzzling railworkers

By Oscar Grenfell, 7 February 2018

Having used the ruling of the Fair Work Commission to suppress a strike, for which rail workers voted, the Rail, Tram and Bus Union is trying to silence them and censor any expressions of opposition.

San Diego mayor outlines impending crackdown on homeless

By Meenakshi Jagadeesan, 30 January 2018

Mayor Kevin Faulconer combined praise of the city’s meager response to the recent hepatitis A outbreak with a thinly veiled threat that homelessness would no longer be tolerated.

Another rapid rise in Australia’s prison population

By John Harris, 30 January 2018

The 40 percent increase over the past five years points to the escalating impact of “law and order” campaigns, anti-democratic bail laws and punitive sentencing requirements.

“This could be anyone tomorrow”

Anaheim, California: Homeless encampment residents speak on their conditions

By Adam Mclean, Kevin Martinez and Kimie Saito, 29 January 2018

Rather than offering assistance to those living on the riverbed, the city has started a “slow and methodical” drive to shut down the encampment.